Knuck If You Buck: I Don’t Drink Around White People.

Garrick McFadden
10 min readNov 4, 2022

“Knuck if you buck boy
Knuck if you buck boy
Knuck if you buck boy.” — Knuck If You Buck, by Crime Mob

The relatively new TV show with the dragons and the thrones that weak-ass white people are claiming is too woke because it has black people in it, reminded me of one immutable fact: Don’t get drunk around a bunch of white people. You know the scene where the black person covered his goblet because he was in a room of all white people and refused to drink under these circumstances resonated across the Culture. Black Twitter was abuzz for days regarding this realistic detail. I too joined in the merriment. However, as weeks passed I found myself thinking about this photo more than I should. Yes, it was funny. Some of the tweets were hilarious. Finally, I realized why my mind would not let go of this meme: I don’t drink in front of white people either. One or five white people, no problem. When we start pushing one black person for every 15 or 20 white people that is when I enter involuntary sobriety. I am not about to be in any situation lacking. A party with 200 people and three black people, I ain’t drinking. It is like when you are at a party and someone says they rolling deep in this mug it is a subtle warning to say your goodbyes and create new plans for the evening. If I am at any type of private event or in a secluded place, I have one unshakeable rule: don’t drink around white people if our numbers are low.

My parents do not drink. I do not think my brother drinks either. So they never told me not to drink in front of white people, but when I was in high school I never had a drink. In my grade of 550 students about seven of us were black. I had a sufficient level of popularity that I could attend any party that I wanted to and I did. My best friend, during that time, supplied most of the booze for the high school. Despite him being the life of most of the parties, I never had a drink. Perhaps, because of my size. I was 5'4" in high school, and after my senior wrestling season, I never climbed over 120 pounds. I was small. If I was attacked I would have to be in perfect control of all my faculties to defend myself or talk myself out of a fight.

During high school, if a party had 50 guests I was probably the only black person. Do you think I was going to get drunk surrounded by all of these white people in towns named Apple Valley, Eagan, Rosemont, or Burnsville? Despite not…

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Garrick McFadden

I am a civil-rights attorney. I write about #whiteness, #racism, #hiphop, policing & politics. https://gamesqlaw.com/index.php/thoughts/